Sometimes, the best thing that one can do when faced with overwhelming, and rather legitimate, criticism is to do nothing at all and hope that people eventually forget about whatever it is that they were complaining about. Evidently, this maxim does not prove to be true if you happen to work at a major video game development company like Bungie and virtually every complaint about your latest project, Destiny 2, is centered around one singular aspect of said project.

Ever since Destiny 2 was released in September 2017, there has been no shortage of complaints about the game from its audience, and nothing was more despised than the game’s microtransaction store, Eververse, which gives players the opportunity to exchange real money for fake money which can then be used to buy loot boxes that offer completely randomized items. While such complaints and concerns have always existed, they have certainly ramped up in intensity over the holiday season as people start to realize that Bungie is locking no small amount of supposedly free content behind Eververse.

Bungie’s own official forums have been clogged up to the point of uselessness by pleas to remove, or at the very least rework, Eververse while various other forums dedicated to Destiny 2 discussion, such as the game’s subreddit, are experiencing similar amounts of discontent. It is not much of an exaggeration to say that both of the aforementioned forums have reached a point where it is practically impossible to determine what percentage of the game’s audience is unsatisfied because it seems as though everyone, from the casual weekend-only players to the hardcore grinders, is quite displeased with Bungie’s handling of Eververse. The main means of discussing this on their is through the #RemoveEververse tag that has taken over the front page of the forum and many of the areas around it.

There is little doubt that the inciting incident for such a virtual rebellion can be traced back to the release of Destiny 2’s first DLC, the Curse of Osiris, which drew no small amount of criticism for being shallow in every aspect; aside from giving players access to a laughably overpowered gun for a couple of days, the DLC was a decidedly disastrous attempt to revitalize the game’s audience. The flames were further fueled by the Dawning seasonal event, which turned out to be another disaster in that while the event was technically free, it introduced nothing of value to the game other than a new set of cosmetic items that were locked behind the Eververse paywall.

Needless to say, public opinion is turning against Bungie rather quickly and Bungie has yet to respond in any meaningful way. If there is one silver lining to the whole situation, it’s that Destiny 2’s audience still cares enough about the game to complain about it rather than falling into apathy and moving on to some other game, but that’s like saying “At least some people made it off the Titanic before it sank.”


Anson Chan

Staff Writer

You ever wonder why we're here? It's one of life's greatest mysteries, isn't it? Good thing games exist so that we don't have to think about it. Or at least I don't have to think about it. Instead, I'll just play Halo or something.