TTCombat Army and Terrain Paint Brushes Preview

TTCombat Army Brushes.

Preview

TTCombat Army and Terrain Paint Brushes Preview

July 17, 2021

By: Adam Potts

 
 

TTCombat, the producers of the awesome Carnevale and Rumbleslam have just released two sets of paint brushes for all your wargaming needs. TTCombat recently released a huge selection of spray paints to undercoat your miniatures and their two brush ranges allow you to build up from there.

Both ranges of TTCombat brushes are extremely cost-effective synthetic brushes. The wood feels durable, and the metal end connects firmly to the wood. The metal fits firm around the bristles, and we found cleaning them very easy. The points on the layer and detail brush are especially strong and allow for accurate coats and detail. The price for the brushes is also very reasonable for the quality you get. 

We'll detail each brush below, and what it should be used for.

TTCombat Army Brushes.

The first range is the TTCombat Army Brushes, and includes six different styles for different painting requirements and techniques.

 
 
  • Army – Basecoat Brush - The thick basecoat brush is designed to get the first coat of paint on after the primer, the first core paint of each area. The focus for the brush is an even layer, without worrying too much about detail.
  • Army – Layer Brush - The layer brush is thinner than the basecoat brush, but still has depth to it's bristles, allowing you an even second and beyond layer to build up from the basecoat.
  • Army – Detail Brush - The detail brush is for after the layers are complete, and the small bristles are perfect for picking out the small details to make your miniature pop.
  • Army – Fine Detail Brush - The tiny bristles on the fine detail brush are for the tiniest parts of your miniatures, eyes, and freehanding markings.
  • Army – Large Drybrush - Drybrushing is a technique where paint is applied to the brush, and then cleaned off, leaving only a small amount that is run gently over miniatures to pick out the raised detail. The large drybrush can be used for a larger spread of paint, for quicker, less detailed results. The angled bristles allow for more control in hard-to-reach areas.
  • Army – Small Drybrush - The small drybrush allows for more intimate detail, but still with the speed of drybushing. The angled bristles allow for more control in hard-to-reach areas and small detail areas.
TTCombat Terrain Brushes.

The second range is the TTCombat Terrain Brushes, and includes five different styles of brushes for the different scenery painting needs.

  • Terrain – Basecoat Brush - The terrain basecoat brush has a wide set of bristles, allowing you to apply a lot of paint on an even layer across a wide surface of terrain, or lager miniatures.
  • Terrain – Layer Brush - The terrain layer brush is slightly smaller than the basecoat brush, for more control with a larger amount of paint than the army brushes.
  • Terrain – Detail Brush - The terrain detail brush is smaller than the layer brush, but still has a wide head of bristles to hold more paint than the army brushes, to allow you to pick out detail on scenery and larger miniatures.
  • Terrain – Texturing Brush - The texturing brush allows uneven painting across surfaces, giving a more random feel to wood, rust, and cloth.
  • Terrain – Stippling Brush - Stippling is a technique that allows you to apply a mix of paint to surfaces, most hobbyists use a sponge to get the effect, but the Terrain Stippling brush gives the effect quickly, with the control and the easy clean features of a brush.

The full range of TTCombat brushes, along with their spray paints, and awesome wargames like Rumbleslam and Carnevale can be bought directly from TTCombat here.

 

A Potts TechRaptor
Tabletop Specialist

Adam is a tabletop specialist for TechRaptor. He's been involved in the video game and tabletop industry since 1997, including managing communities, flavor text writing for CCGs, game development, and design, and has played physical and digital card games at a high competitive level.

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