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Destructive Creations have been a bit busy lately. They recently announced a game about fighting ISIS, and now they’ve gone back with a significant update to the “controversial” Hatred. That update is specifically the addition of mod support, which has been in the works for a while. A very detailed walk-through was added by developer DC_Vipeout over at the Steam Discussion forums, which has a bit of detail modders need to know before they start. The guide is pretty detailed on each step of the process, so those with some technical know how may be able to do a lot with the tools in question.  It adds to a small list of Unreal Engine 4 games that have officially announced support for modding along with Ark: Survival Evolved, as the engine is still in its infancy stage. One downside however is that the requirements to use the engine and modding are pretty significant: needing at least 8 GB (preferred 16 GB) and a reasonable CPU behind it.

The developers have started off by providing an example: a Valentine’s Day Massacre mod created by the developers themselves, just in times to enjoy with your loved ones

The controversial title comes out less then a week from the announced change by Twitch.

The opportunity to cause even more mayhem has been added by Destructive Creations.

One thing to note is that there is a EULA with this, and it’s pretty specific on what is allowed and what is not. While modding can always go into some dangerous territory via the Steam Workshop (due to copyrights and trademarks possibly being broken), there’s a couple of things that are made clear here. There’s more generic technical ones like no *.exe file modifications, which makes sense given the Steam platform. But you also are not allowed to add “forbidden symbols” into the game: things such as swastikas, sexual materials, or any “other symbols considered generally forbidden” (and are illegal in some locations). In addition, you can’t recreate historical events of the past, and they specifically indicate that you can’t legally make a 9/11 map. On top of that, you can’t depict a real person legally without first obtaining permission from that said person. This is largely informing users on legal and Steam and Steam Workshop EULA’s terms, although some of them are additions of their own.

Quick Take

While TechRaptor never covered it formally, I did take a look at the game on my own Youtube Channel at the time, and I can see this bringing some good variety to gameplay if done right. The technical part of the engine seemed sound, and I did love the destructible environments. With that said, I’m worried about what the reaction to this will be, despite the fact that Destructive Creations have been pretty clear on the content allowed in the game.

Shaun Joy

Staff Writer

YouTuber Dragnix who plays way too many games, and has a degree in Software Engineering. A Focus on disclosure on Youtubers, and gaming coverage in general.