TR Member Perks!

In a blog post today, Nokia has asked us to say goodbye to Nokia Lumia, and say hello to Microsoft Lumia. This was totally expected, considering that Nokia was acquired by Microsoft earlier this year.

To many people reading this, the move that Nokia and Microsoft made can be seen as Game Over for Nokia’s phones. On the other hand, this was something that plays perfectly into Microsoft’s core strategy of unifying its hardware development with its core OS development much like how Apple did since back in the 90s. The strategy of tying software to one unified hardware platform has led Apple to become a largely successful company with stable products. Instead of having to take multiple hardware configurations into consideration, the company only had one set of hardware to worry about.

The name change itself is Microsoft’s way of cementing the tie between its phones and its brand.

“This is a very exciting time for us and for Lumia products,” said Tuula Rytilä, SVP of marketing for phones at MS. “You might have seen that in the last couple of months, we have already made some name changes to our apps to better reflect that these apps now come from Microsoft. Our global and local websites are going through a transition as we speak and in the coming days our social channels will get a new name too — they will be called Microsoft Lumia.”

When asked when a Microsoft Lumia device would appear on the market, Rytilä was in “talk to the press” mode, saying that they are looking to release a Lumia device of their own “soon”. That last word is very open to interpretation, but leaves some hope that we may one day see a Microsoft phone designed with the technology and ingenuity of Nokia’s previous research and development department.

What do you think? Will Microsoft’s future phone be a flop? Or will it be something refreshing that may actually sell?

Miguel Leiva-Gomez

With a reputation for writing suit-and-tie articles, Miguel Leiva-Gomez needed a place to relax and let loose. Aside from deciphering the workings behind the most complex business systems, he also takes time off throughout the day to play some vidya. Ever since the early 90s when he first got his Sega Genesis, Gomez has been pressing himself to win every game he played. It was this virtually lifelong fascination with games that made him become a gaming journalist. Outside of writing, Gomez also specializes in application development using C++, C, LUA, and Python. He's also a fan of the Oxford comma and wants you to deal with it.