As part of our Start Collecting series, we recently looked at Micro Art Studios Kokkyo-3 Infinity scenery. We liked it so much, we decided to have a look at their scenery for other wargames. As avid players of Star Wars Legion, we loved the look of their new Imperial Depot and it didn’t disappoint.

War Gaming is an all-in hobby and isn’t just about the gaming. There’s a whole background of tasks that need to be completed before you can actually physically start playing. These range from learning the rules to putting your models together and creating your army list. After that, there’s logistics to think of in where you are going to play, you will need scenery, what will you play on, and how will you transport your miniatures? And then there’s the art of making your miniatures look incredible by painting them. For many gamers, painting and modifying their miniatures are the most exciting part; some don’t even play but simply enjoy that side of the hobby. As part of our Start Collecting series for Infinity, Warhammer 40k, and Warmachine, we’re also going to look at some of the accessories, from paint and brushes, to cases for transporting your models, to scenery and other items that will make your life easier.

If there’s something you would like us to cover, let us know in the comments.


The Imperial Depot comes as two identical halves. Each half is on several HDF sprues which are extremely easy to fit together. The instructions provided are easy to follow and each pieces fits well in place and is secured using PVA glue.

The Imperial Depot features a removeable roof, so that you can continue your battles inside. Doors at either end, don’t require gluing and can be opened and closed. Both pieces also feature a side door that can be pushed in and out depending on your cover requirements. The two halves of the Imperial Depot can be used together, or kept separate as individual pieces of scenery, or even used as the access area for a larger underground setting.

Inside the Depot are walkways which perfectly fit the troops from Star Wars Legion.

After we put our pieces together, we sprayed them with Games Workshop’s Corax White. They are sizeable pieces of terrain, so do require a fair amount of paint, but the results are worth it. The grooves pre-cut into the pieces really make the details pop. Vents, panel joins and access controls really stand out against the white paint, and will even more so when painted fully.

We took our Imperial Depot to Forbidden Planet International in Aberdeen to photograph them with their painted Star Wars Legion miniatures. Which you can see in the gallery below. If you’re ever in that area, pop in to see them.

We were also interested in the Star Wars Legion vehicles that could fit inside, so we gradually scaled up the units. Starting with the Speeder Bikes, of which a whole squadron can fit inside and exit via the open doors easily. The AT-RT also fits inside well, as does the T-47. You can also fit in an AS-ST, as long as it’s hunched down on its legs, maybe as an ambush for any Rebels trying to break in to the facility.

Even when not inside the facility, the Imperial Depot also provides cover for the AT-ST, making it a fantastic piece of line of sight blocking terrain.

As with all Micro Art Studio products, we love the high-quality of the products and the ease of putting them together. Beginners will find it very simple to get incredible results, even if only with a base coat. Veterans however will be able to make the scenery look incredible, as the basics are so easy to get right, they will be able to focus on the detail.

The Imperial Depot is a well-designed piece of terrain, that will make a great centre piece for any Star Wars Legion game.

Have you put together any of Micro Art Studio’s scenery before? What did you think? What do you think of the Imperial Depot? Let us know in the comments below.

The Imperial Depot used in this article was provided by Micro Art Studio, the unpainted Star Wars Legion miniatures were provided by Asmodee UK and the painted miniatures were provided by Forbidden Planet International in Aberdeen.


Adam Potts

Associate Tabletop Editor

Adam is the Senior Tabletop Staff writer for TechRaptor. He's been involved in the video game and board game industry since 1997, from managing communities to flavour text writing for CCGs and game development and design.


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