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Wizards of the Coast has just announced that beginning with their recently announced Magic: The Gathering set Kaladesh, they will be conducting playtesting for a new type of in-store Sealed league. Sealed, alongside Draft, is one of the two formats that comprise Limited, where players construct decks for matches from the contents in Booster Packs. In Sealed, players are given a number of Booster Packs to construct a forty-card deck from, using basic lands provided by the store to build their land base from.

However, unlike the usual procedures and restrictions found in Sealed, the Sealed leagues that Wizards of the Coast are introducing will have subtle differences. Instead of constructing a minimum forty-card from six Booster Packs, players will construct a minimum thirty-card deck from the contents of three Booster Packs; the deck will be used in single-game matches for four weeks, with each game having one free mulligan at the beginning.

At the start of the second, third, and fourth weeks of the Sealed league, players will receive an additional Booster Pack to add to their card pool and reconstruct their deck if they wish; players can additionally reconstruct their deck at any point they wish during the duration of the league. Players will receive Planeswalker Points based on their standing in the league; its unknown at this time if any further prize support is planned by Wizards of the Coast, or if that will be left up to individual local game stores.

Wizards of the Coast is aiming to receive enough feedback from the playtesting in Kaladesh to have a full launch of Sealed leagues for the next block in Magic: The Gathering, Amonkhet.

Stay tuned to TechRaptor for further information on the status of in-store Sealed leagues and all things Magic: The Gathering.


Quick Take

I find this to be a great idea as it not only benefits casual players who aren’t looking to spend lots of money on constructing a deck for Friday Night Magic, but also players who are new to Magic: The Gathering and looking to learn some of the rules and interactions. Many local game stores run some type of league similar to what we see outlined in this playtesting announcement from Wizards of the Coast, so having support for it will only mean more people will be interested in playing – depending on how the entry cost is priced, of course.

What are your thoughts on this new type of Sealed league? Is this something that you would enjoy playing in your local game store? Let us know in the comment section below.


Brandon Bobal

Partner Manager

Brandon writes articles with focuses on video and board games, and Magic: The Gathering. When he isn't doing research for his weekly Magic: The Gathering column, he can be found enjoying the outdoors.