Bossa Studios, creators of games like I Am BreadSurgeon Simulator and more, have announced that their more serious project Worlds Adrift will be hitting Steam Early Access on May 17. Announced as part of the London Game Festival today, they took the opportunity to also have their soundtrack performed live by composer Murugan Thiruchelvam and singer Freja Frances.

Worlds Adrift endeavors to more fully embrace the concept of community creation in a massively multiplayer online game – something many have looked at but none have really accomplished. To that end, World’s Adrift has been in a sort of closed-beta. People buying founder’s packs on their website are able to get in and help shape the game. Beyond that, they’ve also had a free Worlds Adrift Island Creator available on Steam since 2016, which anyone could use to submit islands for the game – and many have with some spectacular ones being exhibited on the game’s official website.

In Worlds Adrift you build yourself a skyship in one of these places and take off with a crew to explore the various islands throughout the skies. Form alliances with friends, discover lost technologies, battle in the skies against enemies and explore to find what lies ahead.

Speaking about Worlds Adrift, here’s what Henrique Olifiers the CEO and co-founder of Bossa Studios had to say:

“When we went into Closed Beta in May last year, we couldn’t have envisioned the sheer amount of quality feedback we would receive from our inspiring community. At times, this completely shifted our production’s scope, and as a result, helped us truly hone Worlds Adrift’s vision, and has got it to this unique place. We now feel ready to take the game to a much wider audience, and work even more closely with the players to ensure we continue to learn and improve it. This is another reason why we label Worlds Adrift as the first Community-Crafted MMO.”

Worlds Adrift goes into Steam Early Access May 17 and will cost $24.99.


Don Parsons

News Editor

I've been a gamer for years of various types starting with the Sega Genesis and Shining Force when I was young. If I'm not playing video games, I'm often roleplaying, reading, writing, or pondering things brought up by speculative fiction.