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Live streaming service Infiniscene has announced that their service will remain free of charge, according to a post on the company’s website.

The post by Co-founder and CEO Stu Grubbs states that their original plan for pricing their streaming service, which included both free content and a $10 a month price tag that was first announced at TwitchCon in early October, has been changed.

Grubbs stated that the team took a look at their established mandate, to “build innovative, powerful creative software that empowers more storytellers & grows the communities in which they tell them.” After doing so, he mentions that the storytellers include the gamers, creators and entertainers will find success, and that is why the team decided to keep the service free of charge for all content creators. He did note that the service may adopt a “Pro” plan in the future, but for now, Infiniscene will stay free of charge.

Infiniscene is touted as a “simple, powerful and collaborative live streaming software” that provides a low barrier of entry for users to start livestreaming. Several features touted by the team include lower CPU usage, use of cloud storage to both backup videos and use fewer resources on your computer. Future updates include the ability for Infiniscene to directly connect with streaming tools such as TwitchAlerts and Steampro, and collaboration through remote simultaneous streaming.

Infiniscene was founded by several esports, gaming, and video game industry veterans back in 2015. Most of their funding has been provided by venture capital since October of 2015; the company originally raised over $1.83 million in starting capital. Notable investors include MK Capital, MATH Ventures and the Pritzker Group. It has just recently entered its third round of funding, after winning an award at the 15th Annual Chicago Innovation Awards in October of 2016.

What are your thoughts on Infiniscene’s move here? Leave your comments below. 


Robert Grosso

Staff Writer

A game playing, college teaching, erudite-minded scholar who happens to write some articles every so often. Have worked as a journalist, critic, educator and blogger for over five years now, with articles published (as user editorials) on Game Revolution and Giant Bomb as well as a contributor for the websites Angry Bananas and Blistered Thumbs. Now making TechRaptor my home.


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