Nintendo has denied speculation that The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword will see a re-release on the Switch. In a statement to Eurogamer, Nintendo said: “At this time we have no plans to release The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Nintendo Switch,”.

Speculation of a re-release arose after series producer Eiji Aonuma seemingly alluded to a release during a Zelda concert performance in Japan. He was quoted as asking “I know what you are thinking, Skyward Sword for Switch, right?” while on stage, leading many to think that The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword would be the next title in the series to get a remaster.

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword was originally released in 2011 for the Wii, and later re-released on the Wii U in 2016. It is notable for its extensive use of the Wii Motion Plus accessory, which gave the player a 1:1 movement control over Link’s sword movements. However, this was also the source of much criticism, as many found the controls clunky and unresponsive. The game was also criticized for its overworld, excessive tutorials, and for sidekick Fi being overbearing. Despite these, the game received nearly universal critical acclaim at launch, though it has since received numerous criticisms.

However, it is plausible that a remaster could be incoming. Skyward Sword is the only 3D home console Zelda older than Breath of the Wild that has not had any sort of remaster. The Nintendo 64’s Ocarina of Time and Majora’s Mask saw 3D remakes on the 3DS, and the Gamecube’s The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess had HD remasters on the Wii U.


Quick Take

I’d say it’s likely Nintendo will eventually remake Skyward Sword for the Switch. However, if they do so, they would have to make quite a few changes. The Joycons do not seem to have the 1:1 motion replication that the Wii Motion Plus did, and the Switch as of now lacks a sensor bar to handle actions like aiming the bow and arrow. They would also likely make quality of life improvements like they did with The Wind Waker, such as increasing the movement speed of Link’s bird in the sky and toning down Fi drastically. I personally had no issues with the motion controls, but I did not like Fi’s constant explanations and interruptions, or how the game felt artificially padded for length by having you do things like fight the Imprisoned multiple times. With a few tweaks the game could be much like The Wind Waker HD, a remaster that fixes glaring problems in an otherwise great game.


John Quilty

Staff Writer

I've been a lover of video games, writing, and technology for as long as I remember. I have a B.A. in English from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and I'm happy to write about gaming and technology for TechRaptor.


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