The Spirit of Europe - Origins is a Free JRPG Funded by the European Commission

Spirit of Europe

Latest News

The Spirit of Europe - Origins is a Free JRPG Funded by the European Commission

October 4, 2021

By: Patrick Perrault

 
 

This is an interesting one: Predict Edumedia has released The Spirit of Europe - Origins, which is a 15-hour long educational (edutainment) free JRPG title with a self-described "philosophical flavor". The game will be available to download on PC via Steam and on itch.io. 

This isn't the first edutainment title coming from a governmental body. The US Department of Education gave the Historymaker VR developers a $1 million USD grant. Edutainment games are nothing new - we've covered some in the past such as our list of six great education games for adults if you're interested, as well as even some educational coronavirus titles developed back in February 2020. Basically, this is a genre that's been gaining steam (heh) for a while now, dating back to the 80s, and still going strong to this day.

Going back to Spirit of Europe, players will be able to play and learn about the story of Europe, going through historical periods like Ancient Greece, The Roman Empire, Migration Period, The Viking Age, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. You'll see the perspectives of different gods that can possess any mortal that can range from a commoner to a great figure in history. You'll then gain influence and inspire them to help build the European civilization that exists today. 

How do I play this free JRPG?

In order to access The Spirit of Europe - Origins, you have to fill out a long registration before you can play the game. Why do you have to fill out the a boring data sheet? Well, this is why:

 
 

We're just trying to assess the success of such edutainment products from various points of view: entertainment, learning outcomes, time invested vs gains, from an educational and entertainment perspectives. Our hypothesis is that as long as learning is fun enough, learning comes virtually free. Since we are trying to find out how to make better and better edutainment games in a scientific manner, we need to collect various data just like any other developer (regarding what players like/dislike, technical specs etc.) aside from those specifically required by our research endeavor (assessment scores before/after finishing the game, opinions on the quality/quantity of information, its relevance, learning outcomes etc.)

Fair enough, I guess, since the game is free there is usually a way that you still have to pay for the product. The common adage is that "if a product is free, you're the product", and it's nice to see an explanation as to why exactly the European Commission wants potential players to fill out their quiz. 

For more information on The Spirit of Europe - Origins, stay tuned to TechRaptor.

Comments