Project xCloud Signups Now Open For October's Open Beta

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Project xCloud Signups Now Open For October's Open Beta

September 24, 2019

By: Alex Santa Maria

 
 

Microsoft is ready to open its streaming platform to the masses. In October, Xbox players will be able to sample playing Halo 5: GuardiansGears 5, Sea of Thieves, and Killer Instinct on their mobile phone with a Bluetooth controller. Interested testers can head over to the official xCloud website to register starting today. The program will only support Android phones initially and you'll need a Bluetooth controller to hook up. If you end up with a golden ticket, you can play the three test games over WiFi or a mobile connection.

In a conversation about the program as part of today's Inside Xbox presentation, Kareem Choudhry revealed more details about the upcoming test. Users in the US, the UK and Korea will be eligible to register, although they promised to expand the test as time goes on. Also, host Major Nelson reminded viewers that save games, achievements and other user data will transfer between Xbox, PC, and xCloud devices. You can pick up a game in one room on one device and switch at will without losing any progress.

https://twitter.com/majornelson/status/1176622754352812033

Kareem mentions that Xbox employees have been testing the service for months and months, and they know that it's ready for primetime. To ensure a smooth launch, they've partnered closely with mobile providers T-Mobile in the United States, Vodaphone in the UK, and SK Telecom in Korea. Despite these technical partnerships, the beta supports all cell phone providers in each region.

 
 

Other details about the program, including details about streaming from your existing Xbox One to mobile devices, will be coming at a later date.


Quick Take

It will be very interesting to see how well xCloud holds up to public scrutiny. Despite good impressions by many in early tests, many of those came under the watchful eye of Microsoft in controlled environments. Will the technology work away from the convention hall and in your own home? Will you be able to play Halo even in the more Internet-starved regions of the country? Only time will tell.
Alex Santa Maria TechRaptor
Former Reviews Editor

TechRaptor's Former Reviews Editor (2015-2020). Resident fan of pinball, Needlers, roguelikes, and anything with neon lighting. Owns an office chair once used by Billy Mays.

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