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Nintendo Creators Program Ending As Company Reverses Course

November 28, 2018

By: Robert N. Adams

 
 

An announcement has gone out regarding the Nintendo Creators Program ending very soon on the company's official Twitter. Details on the closure are expanded in a linked news post on the company's website.

Previously, Nintendo wouldn't really allow people to monetize videos on YouTube featuring any of their games. The Creators Program was first announced back in 2015, intended as a sort of middle ground solution for all involved parties. YouTubers would be able to monetize their videos by registering with the program and Nintendo would get a portion of the revenue the YouTubers took in. The program saw a number of issues including an eventual ban on YouTube live streaming in 2017. That is all changing with the announcement of the Nintendo Creators Program ending.

 

The program is set to close by the end of December 2018. Any pending applications to the program won't be processed and no new applications will be accepting. With the Nintendo Creators Program ending, YouTubers and other content creators will generally be free to upload content featuring Nintendo's vast library of games.

That's not to say that the company has completely lightened up on the idea of transformative content. A new series of content guidelines have been released that will supplant the Creators Program and should be easier to follow overall.

 
 

Several of the restrictions are sensible enough and would get you demonetized by any company, not just Nintendo. YouTubers, live streamers, and the like won't be able to imply that they're associated with Nintendo or outright sell their videos. You can't play pirated Nintendo games. One key restriction is the notion that you can't just show gameplay without any additional commentary on your part - something that is viewed as a bit of a grey area when it comes to video game content of this type.

Of course, Nintendo also reserves the right to remove anything at any time outside of these guidelines. A lengthy F.A.Q. has more comprehensive answers about the Nintendo Creators Program ending and the new rules that will replace it. For now, though, content creators have a reason to celebrate - it won't be long before they can make videos and streams based on Nintendo's stuff without much to worry about.

 
 

What do you think of the Nintendo Creators Program ending? Do you think the program accomplished their goals or was it a waste of time? Let us know in the comments below!