Nintendo Brings Educational Nintendo Labo Program to Australian Classrooms

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Nintendo Brings Educational Nintendo Labo Program to Australian Classrooms

April 1, 2019

By: Kyle Downey

 
 

Nintendo Labo has continued its educational program worldwide, this time heading to the land downunder. Nintendo Australia is partnering with 100 primary schools to help add Nintendo Labo into the curriculum the same way traditional arts and crafts have been used in schools but with a STEM-focused twist that should be much more engaging for kids in today's digital age. Nintendo Australia is beginning with an Australian-first primary school program with the primary focus being on teaching the basics of science, math, art, technology, and engineering. The program is using the Nintendo Labo to introduce STEM skills to primary school-aged children in a fun and engaging way they might not otherwise be exposed to.

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The first session of the program was at Strathcona Baptist Girls Grammar, with the help of Girl Geek Academy, in Melbourne on March 20. The session had girls work together on building the Nintendo Labo Toy-Cons and then using them to test out their handiwork. Gamers Classified was able to interview Michelle Dennis, Head of Digital Learning and Innovation at Strathcona Baptist Girls Grammar, and Sarah Moran, CEO, and Co-Founder of Girl Geek Academy to give their perspective on the program and its importance. Dennis stated of the program:

Since Nintendo Labo kits combine hands-on creation and technology, they can be a great way to illustrate basic STEAM concepts, as well as skills including communication, critical thinking, creativity, and problem-solving. The girls are gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of Nintendo Labo by making, playing and discovering the intricacies of the technology, but also how a piece of software, such as the Nintendo Labo, is created and used from a user perspective.
Moran also spoke of the value in enabling the girls to learn basic STEM concepts, but recognized the importance of fun in making the experience more than just a school lesson saying, "Students will be exposed to STEM through play – I’ve been in the classroom alongside kids in the program and we all had a blast. This is a new way of getting practical experience, by using technology kids love in new creative ways."

The start of the program looks to have been a success and as the program continues and begins to spread, more and more kids will get a chance to see subjects they've learned about in the classroom in a whole new light. It seems likely that Nintendo will continue to build programs like this one going forward with Nintendo Australia Managing Director Kamon Yoshimura saying of the program, "We hope our program provides children across Australia with the tools to build, explore, problem-solve and, in the process, get excited about design and technology – all while having fun."

Kyle Downey TechRaptor
Staff Writer

Staff Writer looking to keep you both informed and entertained. Favorite games include: Pokemon, Overwatch, Golden Sun, Portal, and Elder Scrolls.

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