Sega Rome Total War 2 box mockup

Fully Recyclable Packaging Will Be Used for Sega Europe's PC Games

January 31, 2020

By: Robert N. Adams

 
 

Sega Europe has announced its intention to shift to recyclable packaging for the physical editions of its PC games in a press release.

Believe it or not, some of the video game cases you buy aren't exactly recyclable. Sega aims to change that in the future with a commitment to use fully-recyclable packaging for their entire PC lineup in the future.

 

Previously, the company more or less ran a test with Football Manager 2020, consulting with various points in the manufacturing and distribution chains to see if it was reasonably possible to make the shift. Gary Dale, SEGA Europe's President and COO had the following to say about this decision.

This initiative underlines SEGA Europe’s commitment to reducing its plastic waste and its ongoing efforts to implement environmentally friendly business practices, Our estimations with regards to Football Manager 2020 suggested we’d save up to 20 tonnes of plastic packaging for that title alone, so taking this step for the rest of our PC portfolio would see that saving rise exponentially.

SEGA recyclable packaging Football Manager 2020
Football Manager 2020 was a test-case for recyclable packaging.

Shift to Recyclable Packaging Kicks Off With Sega's Rome: Total War 2

Now that the decision has been made, the packaging changes will be made starting with Rome: Total War 2. Yes, that game has been out for some time, but a brand-new edition called Rome: Total War 2 - Enemy at the Gates Edition is pending release. This new version of the game will be a lot more environmentally friendly so you can slay barbarians without all of those sad turtles on your conscience.

 
 

The packaging will consist of a box made from 100% recycled cardboard, and that material can also be recycled again. Printing will use water and vegetable-based inks. The entire package will be shrink-wrapped in LDPE (low-density polyethylene) which is also 100% recyclable.

The only hitch is the disc itself — the materials used for that aren't as easily recycled, but specialized sorting centers are capable of processing these materials.

 
 

Sega shifting to recyclable packaging is a move that's going to cost them money, but it looks like they think it's a move worth making.

What do you think of Sega making the move to recyclable packaging? Do you hope that more game companies follow suit? Let us know in the comments below!