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Twitch bans Radiator 2

Patrick Perrault / July 16, 2016 at 9:00 AM / Gaming, News

Radiator 2, a compilation of three separate titles that were recently released on Steam, has been banned from Twitch. The three games, Hurt Me Plenty, Succulent, and Stick Shift, are described as “experimental games about male sexuality,” and place a focus upon “punishing, eating, and driving”. 

The games themselves are noted to be quite short, with the creator Robert Yang stating that the average run-time ranging from around 10 to 45 minutes. The games’ nudity have been equated to a self-applied rating of PG-13, with the nudity ranging from “bare-butts” to characters “in their underwear.”  

I’m saying this because Radiator 2 has been banned from Twitch, a move that has Yang stating that he feels Twitch’s treatment of him is “humiliating and dehumanizing.” This is because Twitch’s ban of Radiator 2 is the third ban of games that Yang has made, with Rinse and Repeat and Cobra Club  the titles that were banned previously.  

In his blog post, Yang airs his confusion, stating that because Radiator 2 have been able to be streamed released in some form or another for the past one and a half years, (with the Steam release on June 16th) he is confused as to why Radiator 2 is banned from Twitch.

What’s too gay for them, what’s too sexual for them? Why did they change their mind when I re-mastered my games and put them on Steam?

Yang points out allowed games such as South Park: The Stick of Truth, a game that has players fighting a “giant penis boss monster and depicts aliens graphically probing various characters,” and is still allowed to be streamed on Twitch. 


Quick Take

This is a growing issue that needs to be addressed. With Twitch still retaining its stranglehold on the still-growing (and ever-profitable) streaming market, having accountability and clear guidelines for banning games is becoming increasingly essential. Livelihoods can literally depend on Twitch banning games, and these situations are continually reoccurring. Seemingly banning every non-AAA game that brings up the topic of sex is not the answer, and is quite frankly discriminatory and unprofessional. Hopefully, Twitch will soon implement guidelines focusing on transparency and accountability, but I’m not holding my breath.

What do you think of the growing list of ‘prohibited’ Twitch games? Let us know in the comments!


Patrick Perrault

Staff Writer

Writer for TechRaptor, who hopes to gain valuable experience in a constantly changing industry.