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Hong Kong mobile games developer Playcube has released a free-to-play shooter upon the iOS and Android markets. Hero Forces puts you in the shoes of sunglasses-wearing counterterrorist members of the H.E.R.O. organization (what else?) as they fight to thwart the nefarious organization D.O.O.M. and their plans for world destruction. Thus firmly grounded in the tried-and-true plot of Cheat Commandos, you’re free to use the equally tried-and-true arsenal of assault rifles, shotguns, sniper rifles, and RPGs to save everyone in a four-chapter campaign with increasing difficulty and boss fights. Gameplay is based around cover mechanics, as seen by the abundance of chest-high walls.

The other meaning of RPG will also figure prominently, as Hero Forces incorporates persistent leveling, weapons unlocks, and customization. Players will also have the chance to recruit flashy characters to their team and outfit them with the gear they’ve acquired. Although upgrades may of course be purchased, the developers promise that players will not be blocked from progressing for free. 

Besides the campaign, Hero Forces includes three other game modes. A survival mode pits you against neverending waves of enemies, while a multiplayer mode allows either 1v1 or 2v2 deathmatches. There is also a 4-player co-op zombie mode, which would seem to nicely fill out the mobile needs of Call of Duty fans. The variety of maps is unclear, although cities, deserts, and rain-forests will be included.

Playcube also promises new content for the game, including a fifth chapter of the campaign, additional levels for the co-op mode, and various items. New maps may also be a possibility, although unannounced at this time. Whether the updates will require cash is not specified, but the no-paywall policy would seem to exclude that possibility. For more information, check out Hero Force‘s Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or the game’s website itself.

Do you think mobile shooters are capable of the same appeal as their console brethren?  Shoot your opinion in the comments.

Francis Kelly

I'm an enthusiast writer who grew up in the 64 tradition - Commodore, then Nintendo. In the following years, the Internet has given me both online publishing and online multiplayer. It's a wash.