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Fans of the long-running Super Mario franchise have had a lot to talk about when Nintendo recently announced plans to bring the series to the mobile gaming market. Super Mario Run is a collaboration between Nintendo and DeNA, and is their take on the endless runner genre of mobile gaming apps.

Unfortunately, despite a successful premiere alongside the Nintendo Switch on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, the game has come under some scrutiny after it was revealed that it would require an always-on internet connection in order to be played.

In an interview with Mashable’s Adam Rosenberg, Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto told Rosenberg the reasoning behind Super Mario Run requiring an always-on internet connection. According to Miyamoto,

For us, we view our software as being a very important asset for us. And also for consumers who are purchasing the game, we want to make sure that we’re able to offer it to them in a way that the software is secure, and that they’re able to play it in a stable environment. 

Miyamoto would also go on to say that risk of piracy was a concern, as the mobile game is launching in one-hundred fifty countries and each has their own network environments; making the game require an always-on internet connection and only releasing the game for iOS devices would help to reduce the risk of piracy. Android, in particular, is known for having high piracy rates and Miyamoto referenced piracy as a primary security concern.

Since the premiere on the Tonight Show, more information has come out regarding Super Mario Run‘s monetization model. The game will feature no microtransactions, and for the main mode, Mario World Tour, the first four levels (1-1, 1-2, 1-3, 1-4) will be available for free. AT that point, the rest of the game can be unlocked with a one-time purchase of $10.

Super Mario Run will be available on iOS devices starting December 15, 2016.

Stay tuned to TechRaptor for more information on Super Mario Run and all things Nintendo.


Quick Take

I’m not horribly surprised that the developers have gone this route in requiring an always-on internet connection – most mobile titles do. Only initially publishing the game app for iOS devices and not Android devices also makes sense, as Android devices are somewhat more prone to higher rates of piracy than their iOS counterparts. I do wish, however, that this information had been made available much earlier as it would have given potential players more time to make an informed decision on purchasing this game app.

What are your thoughts on this? Do you think that Nintendo shouldn’t have required an always-on internet connection to play Super Mario Run? Let us know in the comment section below.


Brandon Bobal

Partner Manager

Brandon writes articles with focuses on video and board games, and Magic: The Gathering. When he isn't doing research for his weekly Magic: The Gathering column, he can be found enjoying the outdoors.