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After the difficulty Bethesda faced when they announced that they were going to bring mods to the console versions of their games, Sony seemed to be unwilling to go along with Bethesda’s vision for console mods, which led to the brief cancellation of the feature on PlayStation 4. Deals were struck, and Bethesda once again planned to release the feature on both the Xbox One and the PlayStation 4, albeit with a cap on how many mods the game could reserve on the console. Bethesda today announced that the total size for mods on the console versions of the upcoming Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition remaster will also be capped, but players on the Xbox One will have more room to play with than players on the PlayStation 4.

This is done because of the hard drive limitations on consoles, which means that only a small amount of the memory available can be reserved for mods. Players on the Xbox One will have a cap of 5GB in total, whereas players on the PlayStation 4 will have to make do with only 1GB.

While this doesn’t give players a lot to work with, it should be noted that most mods available for the PC version of the game total at anything between just a few kilobytes and a couple of megabytes. Only the largest mods, which are usually total conversions that add a ton of new content to the game such as new areas to explore, new quest lines and new mechanics, will tax the limit significantly. Still, this might lead to you having to make some tough decisions when you’re picking the mods you want to play.

Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition is a remaster of the popular RPG that was released in 2011. Despite its age, the game still enjoys a very large and active player base, not in the least because of the Steam Workshop support baked into the PC version of the game. This remaster bundles the game with all the released DLC in addition to graphical upgrades that make the game look more in line with more recent games. Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Special Edition releases on October 28 for PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.


Chris Anderson

Assoc. News Editor

I've been playing games since I was just barely able to walk, and I never really stopped playing them. When I'm not fulfilling my duties as assistant news editor and tech reviewer, I'm either working on music, producing one of two podcasts or doing freelance work.