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In yet another example that nostalgia is one hell of a drug, the newly released $60 dollar Famicom Classic Mini (the Japanese version of the NES Classic) has managed to sell like hot cakes in Nintendo’s native country of Japan.

According to a report by MCV based on sales figures provided by Japanese games website Famitsu, the tiny NES Classic Mini has sold over 263k units in its first 4 days on store shelves. The little machine has a host of classic NES games installed on its hard drive and is sure to be a blast from the past for everyone who grew up in the early-to-mid-90s.

The device launched in Japan on November 10 as the Famicon Classic Mini, which sports a different design from the NES Classic Mini released in the West. The outer shell isn’t the only difference between both versions of the console, though. The Japanese version has a list of games that is slightly different from the NES Classic Mini released in the West and includes games like River City Ransom and Final Fantasy III.

The NES Classic Mini launched in Western territories on November 11 and has since gone on to sell out in many stores thanks to Nintendo’s limited supply, which has led to third party sellers increasing the price of the device as the consumer demand for the console remains higher than the current supply. For a full list of games found on the NES Classic Mini you can go here.


Quick Take

This is definitely a great start for what is ultimately a supplement to Nintendo’s current efforts. It gives players who don’t have access to the original console a way of playing the games that made this console great, and this console might even introduce a whole new group of gamers to what many consider to be the golden age of gaming. 

Have you bought the NES Classic Mini? How are you liking your trip down to memory lane? Let us know in the comment section down below!


Chris Anderson

Assoc. News Editor

I've been playing games since I was just barely able to walk, and I never really stopped playing them. When I'm not fulfilling my duties as assistant news editor and tech reviewer, I'm either working on music, producing one of two podcasts or doing freelance work.