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Back in 2012, a strange first person horror titled known as ImScared: A Pixelated Nightmare hit GameJolt. While it wasn’t the most terrifying game on the surface, it didn’t take long for players to peel away the true horror of the game through its ever-updating text files. Truly, if ImScared did something well, it was making the player unaware of what this strange executable was really capable of. And now its on Steam.

However, the game’s not just a straight up port. The developer has shown off a whole new area of the game, which likely comes with a whole new slew of 4th wall shattering mindscrews. Sadly, this addition comes with a little caveat. Unlike the original GameJolt version, ImScared costs four dollars (discounted to 2.99 at the time of writing), which is a somewhat noticeable step up considering the original was, you know, free. While it would be understandable for a new version of a game to cost more, the developer had repeatedly stated that ImScared would be free to play, something that is obviously not the case.

Prior to launch, the developer had not announced this change anywhere; in fact, the closest he got to mentioning price was a vague announcement that there would be an opportunity to enhance your experience for “a small amount of money.” This made it quite a surprise when the game released with a price tag attached and absolutely no free to play option. A user on the Steam forums asked the developer, who had this to say:

The Greenlight was originally made to put a “perfect remake” of the old Imscared on Steam. As time passed, Imscared evolved into a much bigger game that took a full year to develop

A demo that covers the 2012 section of the game is on the works, don’t worry!

As much as this would make sense in a normal context, some may find that hard to believe considering that the Greenlight page mentions new features right below exclaiming it will be free to play in bold lettering.

ImScared f2p

What do you think of the recent release of ImScared? Do you think it has enough sizable changes to justify the price tag? And even then, can it still be justified if it was said to be free to play in the past? Let us know in the comments.

Perry Ruhland

Staff Writer

Aspiring author. FPS connoisseur. Tactical games journalist. Digger of giant robots. Professional hater of fun. No matter what role Perry's currently playing, it's a safe bet to assume that he's doing it fairly poorly - but still managing to turn it into some sort of article.