Sekai Project is bringing the indie roguelite A Magical High School Girl to the Switch, marking the first game the studio is publishing for the platform. Announced as part of Sekai Project’s lineup at Anime Boston and Sakura-con, the publisher has announced ports at conventions in the past. No price was given for the release, but it will most likely match the $10 PC version, rather than the cheaper phone price.

Developed by indie studio illuCallabA Magical High School Girl saw a release on Steam in late 2016. Described as a “magic crafting RPG,” A Magical High School Girl sets itself apart from other roguelikes by way of its magic system. In adventuring through dungeons, you can either pick up magic spells, or find crystals that have no spells associated with them. Depending on the name you assign to your magic, it can drastically change the effects and power. Indeed, writing in “Kamehameha” makes your character do the same animation and send out the same energy wave as seen in Dragon Ball.

A Magical High School Girl is not the first time Sekai Project has ported something to a home console. Previously, Sekai Project announced console releases for Root Double and fault milestone one. While the PS4 version of fault milestone one has yet to release, this first Switch release suggests Seka Project may well start focusing on consoles more. The PS Vita saw a wealth of Japanese titles released for it, even with comparatively little support from Western publishers, in part due to its popularity in its home country. The Switch, on the other hand, saw an explosion of popularity in its first year both at home and abroad.

Though there are no major English visual novels on the Switch as of writing, VNs like NekoparaSong of Memories, and others are planned to make their way to the system. With the Switch’s meteoric success likely to continue, we may well see more support from Sekai Project and other Japanese game publishers to come. For now we know that Spring 2018 will feature A Magical High School Girl on Switch.


Kyle Johnson

Japanese Gaming Specialist

Professional painter. Semi-professional weeb. I've played hundreds of games, but finished very few. I speak Chinese and Minnesotan.