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Historically speaking, when you see that a game has been developed and published by Bethesda, it’s probably a safe bet to say that its a decent game, albeit one with a laundry list of bugs and glitches and long loading screens. Bethesda’s latest game, however, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition, may very well be their most disappointing game to date, and that’s not even taking into account how long the title is.

Compared to Fallout 4, the latest entry in Bethesda’s other flagship franchise, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition just feels so dated. When you look at Fallout 4 and juxtapose it with its predecessor, you will almost immediately notice all the changes that were implemented for the sake of making the game more immersive, more streamlined, and just more fun overall. On the other hand, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition feels like it’s a game that comes from the same generation as Fallout 3, incorporating almost none of the quality of life and gameplay changes that can be found in Fallout 4, the most notable of which is the quick loot system. As a result, you’ll likely spend minutes after every battle going through menus and inventories, slowing down gameplay to such a degree that it’s almost a hassle to kill dozens of innocent villagers and their chickens in broad daylight.

Needless to say, you also can’t customize your character to the same degree as in Fallout 4; a clear indicator that Bethesda forgot that some people like to spend their first three hours in a game making sure that their character’s nose is just the right length and girth. Without such options, your mute protagonist simply doesn’t feel like an extension of your own being, making the story feel so shallow and uninteresting that you may as well go around stealing cabbages and wheels of cheese for how engaging it is. After all, if you can’t make a character that accurately represents you, then what is the point of playing a game that lets you kill dragons and consume their souls, or become a werewolf or vampire (and not the super popular tween ones that can be found in the hit franchise Twilight), or explore the ancient ruins of a long-lost race that were only ironically referred to as Dwarves?

Due to Bethesda not providing a pre-release copy for review purposes, screenshots were not able to be obtained in time

Due to Bethesda not providing a pre-release copy for review purposes, screenshots were not able to be obtained in time. This is the next closest thing to an in-game screenshot that can be obtained

On the bright side, Bethesda did continue their tradition of creating beautiful worlds and wonderful NPCs in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition. For example, upon reaching Whiterun (which is about an hour into the game), you will likely hear a guard tell you of how he would’ve been an adventurer like you if it weren’t for an arrow that found its way into his knee, collected some dozen copies of The Lusty Argonian Maid (which provides more in-game lore than the entirety of Destiny), and met Heimskr and Nazeem, quite possibly two of the most pleasant and least annoying NPCs in any game ever (even more so than the Adoring Fan from The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion). Had Bethesda not included such top-notch NPCs into the game, it is likely that The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition will be the last game in the Skyrim franchise.

However, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition doesn’t give you the option to emote, dance, or kill children, so it is literally the worst game ever of all time.

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim: Special Edition was reviewed on the Xbox One with a copy that was obviously not provided by the developer. It is also available on the PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and the PC.

8.5
 

Great

Summary

Imagine a game that is like Far Cry 3 but with no guns, cars, or anything from the modern era, and replace it all with dragons, snow, and mountains that would make Bob Ross jealous.

Pros

  • You get to kill dragons

Cons

  • It feels like it's a game from 2011

Anson Chan

Staff Writer

You ever wonder why we're here? It's one of life's greatest mysteries, isn't it? Good thing games exist so that we don't have to think about it. Or at least I don't have to think about it. Instead, I'll just play Halo or something.