itch.io has revamped their itch app desktop client according to a post on the official blog of the digital games distributor.

If you’re unfamiliar with itch.io, it’s one of many digital distribution services for video games and other neat stuff. While you’ll find professional games, there’s a particular focus on indie titles. Pretty much anyone can sign up and publish their game to the world, whether they would like to make it free, sell it in a pay-what-you-want model, or charge a flat price. The service has been around for some time. Like many digital distributors of games, they have their own desktop program called the itch app. The client has recently received an overhaul thanks to the hard work of their engineer Amos.

itch.io new app layout

Here’s a glance at the revamped itch.io desktop client. Most of the heavy changes have taken place behind the scenes.

Some things haven’t changed with the itch app. It’s still a cross-platform program that’s available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. It’s still open source, translated (wholly or in part) into 20 different languages, and it’s still usable offline.

To the casual user’s eye, the itch app might look the same as it was before. This is only a surface-level representation of all the hard work that’s gone into the client over the last several months. It had several dependencies on third-party software for keeping everything running smoothly. Many of these are now gone in favor of in-house solutions created from the ground up by the team. If you’re one of those computer nerds that like to digest all the technical details, you can read them in full in the blog post itself.

As these things tend to go, the desktop client for this indie-focused digital games distributor will continue to improve in the future. At the moment, a key point of focus is working to improve its functionality on Linux. If you don’t already have the itch app, you can install it for free by heading on over to itch.io/app.

What do you think of the changes made to this app? Do you think it’s an improvement over how it used to be? How do you think the digital distribution service compares to services like Steam and GOG? Let us know in the comments below!


Robert N. Adams

Senior Writer

I've had a controller in my hand since I was 4 and I haven't stopped gaming since. CCGs, Tabletop Games, Pen & Paper RPGs - I've tried a whole bunch of stuff over the years and I'm always looking to try more!