TR Member Perks!

Kingdom Come: Deliverance has been a project in the works for over five years now. Finally, we’re getting a release in 2017! The game is set in Bohemia, a state of the Holy Roman Empire in the 15th century. The game is fully focused on historically accurate content and realism, and the way Tobi Stolz-Zwilling, PR Manager at Warhorse, explained it to me really hit home … “Dungeons and No Dragons.”

The short gameplay slice I was treated to was basically a pseudo-siege on a small bandit encampment, shown in a few different ways to demonstrate how dynamic the game can be. Firstly, we entered the camp, choosing to wipe out the first guard and in a sense go guns blazing. The player character put his dukes up and attempted to fight his way out of the situation. As you can probably imagine, this didn’t go so well.

Tobi explained to me how the “magnet-flanking” system worked. The enemy AI is fine-tuned so that the combat feels fresh and properly difficult. The way you attack is with a star shaped cross-hair, another means to add realism. To hit an enemy, you have to actually touch their body with your weapon, not like the “assumed” attack damage of other famous RPGs. Spears from afar beat daggers and swords, in a more convincing way than usually seen.

Beyond combat, the game is an absolute riot when attacking camps. We were shown setting ammunition on fire to lower their capabilities in the future, and a very interesting twist on sneaking into a camp with the enemies’ armor on. For example, even though our character was wearing the bandit garb, he was still asked what he was doing. You had to pass a speech check in Hungarian to get past his question, or you could either Ignore him or Growl at him, with both of them having a poor chance of success, resulting in the alarm being rung. We were also shown an intricate poisoning system. You could both worsen or improve a stew within the camp to make the inhabitants feel better or (in a more useful manner) kill them.

The poisoning is no instant thing either. The player waited using the in-game cycle, and later the affected guard was complaining, then laying down, and then the next morning he would die of poison. It was explained that the waiting system takes longer than the same system in the Fallout series, due to the fact that each NPC has a day cycle that they must pass through as the day moves on. It’s intricate and awesome, and you can tell that authenticity is the name of the game at Warhorse. 

What’s key to note is that this is an RPG like none other, and it looks to truly change the genre for the better. Watch out for Kingdom Come when it releases in 2017!


Jordan Oloman

Staff Writer

History and Archaeology student from Newcastle in the UK. Loves old school point and clicks, Death Cab For Cutie, and anything made by Double Fine