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The 20th Anniversary remaster of Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers, which was released on PC in October of last year, is now making its way to Apple and Android mobile devices and tablets.  The PC release was a complete remake, with high-res environments, 3D-rendered characters, and a remastered soundtrack.  The mobile version presents itself as every bit the same as the PC version, with the same visual and musical improvements across the board, along with new behind-the-scenes material and interviews with original development team members, coming along for the mobile release with one caveat:  The game will be released in episodes.

Unlike the PC version, which is sold whole for $19.99, The mobile version will be sold incrementally.  With “Day 1” of Gabriel Knight being made available as a free download, the additional days can be purchased in-app, with prices ranging from $2.99 to $3.99.  This gives mobile players the chance to give Gabriel Knight a shot before deciding to drop any money on further progress into the game.

The original 1993 release was much-lauded, winning many “Adventure Game of the Year” awards, and the characters brought to life by a star-studded voice cast on the CD-ROM edition that included the talents of Tim Curry and Mark Hamill, something that, sadly, was also “remastered” in this 20th Anniversary Edition with an all-new voice cast.

Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers 20th Anniversary Edition will be released on mobile platforms on July 23rd.

Quick Take

While it’s great that mobile devices can get certain releases that are every bit as whole as their PC counterparts, I’m hoping that purchasing additional days gets you more than a single “Day,” considering there are 10 “Days” in the game.  Buying Days 2-10 could become costly at $3 to $4 a piece.  Also, there is just no “remastering” the voices of the original cast, especially when the venerable Tim Curry is involved.

Dustin Urness

I am an IT specialist whose had a lifelong affair with computers and gaming since the Atari 2600. I revere gaming as a living art form in all its varieties, and am very glad to be alive in this time of rapid digital innovation. No genre of game is untouchable to me, I'll play anything at least once.