Fig has been a controversial platform for many due to the inherent risks of crowdfunding and its odd structuring. That doesn’t change the fact, however, that it presents an interesting alternative funding method with its mix of curated offerings, traditional crowdfunding, and investment opportunities via Fig Game Shares. However, with the first games that fully fit the model they want to use finally coming out, we can see that at least one of them promises some hope for the style with Kingdoms and Castles.

Funded back in January, Kingdoms and Castles released on Steam and GOG on July 20th and according to gameindustry sharing information from Fig, within 48 hours it had earned enough to return investment to all those who had invested in Kingdoms and Castles Fig Gameshares. Originally raising $108k in its crowdfunding campaign (well past its $15k goal), with over $83k of that being in investments, purchased in $1000 increments. The investment terms were set at investors getting 20% of sales until it got 1.36x back on their investment, and then 10% until reaching 3x the investment or three years have passed. Within 2 weeks, it has done even better, blowing past the 1.36x mark and over 2x return for investors already.

In a statement on the matter, CEO Justin Bailey said the following:

“Fig takes the best instincts of the community and combines them with a publishing model that gives control back to the developers and the fans that believe in their projects – today we proved that community publishing is a successful way to launch a video game. By sharing the commercial success of a specific project with supporters, community publishing shifts the focus from that of just successfully funding games to instead focus on the successful development and commercial viability of the titles”

Beyond Kingdoms and Castles, FIG has also released Solstice Chronicles: MIA recently, albeit to much less fanfare. Still, that title is apparently close to breaking even according to what they told Gamasutra, due to the higher initial revenue share and price point. With a little over 3100 copies sold, the game is less than a thousand away from breaking even at 3856. This is even more impressive considering its launch was relatively recent on July 26.

What do you think of FIG’s early returns for investors? Does this portend good things in the future? Share your thoughts in the comments below!


Don Parsons

News Editor

I've been a gamer for years of various types starting with the Sega Genesis and Shining Force when I was young. If I'm not playing video games, I'm often roleplaying, reading, writing, or pondering things brought up by speculative fiction.