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The upcoming Scandinavia DLC from ETS 2 has been a highly-anticipated addition to the game for its fans. But even for those who aren’t fans of SCS Software’s game are somewhat impressed with the effort undertaken in creating beautiful scenic routes across Europe. The developer has since revealed new details about its upcoming expansion that give us a better idea of what will be delivered once we give our wallets a good shake.

First of all, we’re pretty damn confident that the map will end up looking like this:

scandinavia cities


The map will be adding 19 new cities to the game (compared to the 13 added by Going East) and the creator has announced an emphasis on attempting to recreate the beautiful scenery found in some parts of Scandinavia. Behold, the Hardanger Bridge in Norway:

hardanger bridge


After announcing that new assets and even the Volvo and Scania factories will appear in the DLC, SCS Software revealed a little tour of Örebro:

orebro day


orebro night

You may find the full tour here. Just recently, images of Oslo were revealed by SCS Software, shown with its new upcoming weather engine.

oslo day


oslo evening

According to SCS, Oslo will come with many different loading docks located in districts within the city. This is a significant change of scenery in comparison with the small “cell-sized” cities that it has showcased in the pass and may turn out to be an exciting change. Only time will tell whether the Scandinavia DLC turns out to deliver all of its promises. As far we can see, the DLC is close to being finished and it looks more unique than anything that has been released by SCS to date.

At this point we have no word on release date or pricing, but we hope to learn this within the coming month.

All images in this article are property of SCS Software, distributed via its blog.

Miguel Leiva-Gomez

With a reputation for writing suit-and-tie articles, Miguel Leiva-Gomez needed a place to relax and let loose. Aside from deciphering the workings behind the most complex business systems, he also takes time off throughout the day to play some vidya. Ever since the early 90s when he first got his Sega Genesis, Gomez has been pressing himself to win every game he played. It was this virtually lifelong fascination with games that made him become a gaming journalist. Outside of writing, Gomez also specializes in application development using C++, C, LUA, and Python. He's also a fan of the Oxford comma and wants you to deal with it.