EON, the makers of the popular GCHD Mk-II, have announced that they will be releasing a similar product for the Nintendo 64 dubbed the Super 64.

Like every console before the HD era, the Nintendo 64 exclusively outputs video in a standard definition format, either a 240p or 480i signal. With a stock console, the Nintendo 64 is only capable of outputting those via composite video, which has problems on modern HDTV’s. The image must be upscaled, which many TV’s cannot do in a way that is visually satisfactory, and also have problems with introducing lag.

To properly play N64 games, people have had to resort to using older CRT televisions or HDMI mods, which require soldering a chip onto the motherboard and carving out a place in the casing for a micro HDMI port. The Super 64 allows for HDMI output without any modifications, simply plugging into the back of the console.

In this launch announcement video, you can see it fit firmly into the back of the console, and an HDMI cable goes into the unit. No external power is needed, and a built-in processor specially made to handle the signal prevents the issues seen with a direct connection. The Super64 produces the image in 480p, twice that which was done in progressive scan and does so without adding lag. The unit is also HDMI only, whereas the GCHD Mk-II had SCART as an option as well.

EON’s previous products have included adjustments for scanlines, brightness, and other settings, and the press release promises a “Slick Mode”. “Slick Mode” enables retro fans to relive the triumphs of yesteryear with even smoother visuals, rounding out jagged edges for a sharper image that makes classics look better than ever. Through EON’s careful attention to detail, the Super 64 boasts the truest representation of color to create the most faithful N64 experience supplanting efforts of typical cable upgrades.”

super 64 comparison

The Super 64 will launch in North America on July 22nd on Amazon and “other EON retail partners”.

Correction: We originally stated that the Super64 didn’t state what resolution it went to and speculated that it might be 720p. This was a mistake on our part as the press release states that it upscales the image to 480p. The story above is unchanged aside from that correction.


John Quilty

Staff Writer

I've been a lover of video games, writing, and technology for as long as I remember. I have a B.A. in English from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and I'm happy to write about gaming and technology for TechRaptor.



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