Charity in gaming is something that has seen a big rise in the last ten years as the industry has gotten more and more mainstream. One of the trends that we’ve seen is games supporting charity through both charity streams and donating some sales, particularly of a specific DLC. Dead by Daylight is the latest game to join this trend, with Behavior Digital and Starbreeze’s game releasing a cosmetic DLC for the asymmetrical multiplayer title.

The Dead by Daylight charity case contains 26 cosmetics, 20 of them completely new and 6 previously exclusive items. The cosmetic concepts were designed by broadcasters and contain items for both survivors and killers.

Dead by Daylight Charity Case

All profit from the case goes to the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, an organization that specializes in research on the brain. Since 1987, the organization have granted over $379 million in research grants. In addition, because of the supporting foundations they have, all donations to the organization go directly to research, with the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation not taking on any overhead.

Dead by Daylight released in 2016 and is a 4v1 multiplayer title. In it, you take on the role of either the killer or one of the four survivors who try to escape the location they are trapped in, while the killer attempts to catch and, as the name implies, kill them. There are a variety of survivors and killers, each with differing abilities to help in their roles and each capable of wearing different cosmetics.

You can pick up Dead by Daylight on Steam or Humble Bundle for $19.99, and the new Dead by Daylight charity case costs $4.99 on either Humble Bundle or Steam. If you want to read more about charitable DLC, take a look at what is happening with Arma 3 and their upcoming Laws of War DLC supporting the Red Cross.

What do you think of the Dead by Daylight charity case? Do you think the trend of games incorporating charitable events or donation runs into DLC is a good thing? Share your thoughts in the comments below!


Don Parsons

News Editor

I've been a gamer for years of various types starting with the Sega Genesis and Shining Force when I was young. If I'm not playing video games, I'm often roleplaying, reading, writing, or pondering things brought up by speculative fiction.