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AGDQ, which stands for Awesome Games Done Quick, is a charity stream that has gained massive support the last few years. AGDQ 2015 promises to bring more interesting content and hopes to match AGDQ 2014, which brought in over 1,000,000$ in donations. This year the donations will be going to the Prevent Cancer Foundation. The schedule of games for AGDQ 2015 can be found here and the Twitch stream here. There will be nonstop content beginning on 1/4 at 12pm EST to 1/11 at 12am EST.

Also, the Humble Bundle will have an AGDQ 2015 bundle going on at the same time. It is also worth mentioning that there are incentives to donating to AGDQ 2015 as well. Many of the games will have prizes attached, meaning if you donate at least a certain amount while that game is being played you will be put into the drawing. These include perlers, games, and other gaming related merchandise.

AGDQ  is hosted by Speed Demos Archive, a site and community dedicated to speedrunning. For those unfamiliar, speedrunning is attempting to complete a game as quick as possible. There are various conditions for completion as well. Some classifications dictate that a game must be completed 100%. Others allow speedrunners to use whatever means necessary to end the game as quickly as possibly, the usual ending time being when the final boss is defeated.

Seedrunning is an extremely competitve scene with many talented people from around the world constantly breaking records on a wide variety of titles. It would not be inaccurate to relate it to eSports either as there are plenty of speedrunners that have amassed a large following. Many stream their attempts live and it can be quite the spectacle.

Who knew that just as League of Legends and Dota 2 are considered competitive games, so too are Super Mario 64 and The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, two of the more well-known speedunning games. Just about any game you can think of has been speedran in some way or another and it can be an interesting watch.

Some may think it boring to watch people play some singleplayer games and progress through it, but it can be fascinating to see games like Super Mario 64 and Super Meat Boy played at such a high level. This is especially true with speedruns that do not rely on glitches, as you see still will see people do things you didn’t think possible.

I encourage all to check in to the AGDQ 2015 stream at some point as it can be very interesting to see. Not only do you see games played at a high level, often people also on stream will explain the reasonings behind why the particular speedrunner is doing something. You will surely learn some secrets about games and how they work too.


Andrew Otton

Editor in Chief

Editor in Chief at TechRaptor. Lover of some things, a not so much lover of other things.