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Who says video games can’t be serious business or the instigator of international incidents? Well, anyone who did may want to stop now, as the Bolivian government has filed an official complaint with the French embassy over the depiction of the nation in Ubisoft’s Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands.

Bolivia delivered a letter to the French ambassador, requesting that the government intervene in some way. When speaking to reporters, Bolivian Interior Minister Carlos Romero stated that they prefer to go the route of diplomatic negotiation first, but that they would not rule out legal action.

When Reuters reached out to Ubisoft, the French developer stated that Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands is a work of fiction and that it was chosen as the background for the game due to its landscape and rich culture. The comments given to Reuters emphasize that the world in Ghost Recon Wildlands is a different reality than the one that exists in Bolivia today, but that they hope their in-game world can represent the nation’s beauty well.

Set in a fictionalized Bolivia, Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands takes the series to an open world approach where the players fight the Stana Blanca drug cartel that has taken over the nation and turned it into a narco-state. In fact, the topic of the drug trade was such a heavy focus, that Ubisoft worked on a documentary called Wildlands that covers the real life drug trade and attempts to look at some of the complexities and realities of that matter, that they will be releasing on March 6. That probably did little to further endear themselves to the Bolivian government, as while it’s not expected to be based entirely in Bolivia, its focus on the South American drug trade in general and the game’s connection to Bolivia will probably have many further connect the two.

Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands is set to release March 7 on PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4. It recently had a very successful beta, with over 6.8 million players, marking a new record for Ubisoft.


Don Parsons

News Editor

I've been a gamer for years of various types starting with the Sega Genesis and Shining Force when I was young. If I'm not playing video games, I'm often roleplaying, reading, writing, or pondering things brought up by speculative fiction.