It’s already something of a tradition for big publishers to remove DRM software Denuvo from their newest releases, especially once crackers manage to break through it. BioWare removed it from Mass Effect Andromeda in 2017, and Bethesda Softworks previously removed it from DOOM and Dishonored 2. Now, two days after release, they are also removing it from Rage 2 on Steam. This may be due to the fact that the Bethesda.net release never included this DRM software, and, according to KitGuru, that release allowed crackers to work with a clean executable file. Then, all they had to do was bypass the Bethesda.net online store check-in.

According to the Steam update, the removal of Denuvo was because Bethesda “saw a few requests.” About 40% of current reviews on the game’s Steam page are negative, and many of which clamor for Bethesda to remove Denuvo. Along with the Denuvo removal, the update also fixes some crash issues related to Scaleform and an occasional crash on startup. It also enables the Crash Reporter so users can now help improve the game by sharing details on their crash issues. Another issue was sorted for Bethesda.net users, and the Razer Chroma keyboard effects are now enabled by default. Bethesda says they will continue to review Steam forums and reviews for reported issues, and any other technical support issues should be forwarded to their customer support site.

Our E3 2018 hands-on impressions of Rage 2 were quite positive, and our Reviews Editor is currently working on his full review. In other news, if you’re streaming Rage 2 you can use a very cool Twitch extension so your viewers can help revive you when you get shot too hard by post-apocalyptic punks. You might also be interested in learning more about the Rage 2 roadmap, which promises a lot of cool content in the upcoming months.

Are you enjoying Rage 2? Is the game running better without Denuvo? Let us know in the comments below!


Richard Costa

Staff Writer

Hack for hire, indentured egghead, maverick thoughtcriminal. Mainly interested in Western RPGs, first-person immersion, turn-based tactics, point-and-clickers, and card jousting.


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