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The Assassin’s Creed movie will be in a modern setting 65% of the time and in 15th century Spain the other 35% of the time, according to the film’s executive producer Pat Crowley.

Directed by Justin Kruzel, Directed 2015’s Macbeth, and starring Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard, Assassin’s Creed follow’s Fassbender’s Callum Lynch after he is abducted and forced to experience the memories of his ancestor from the 15th century — Aguilar, a master assassin. If that doesn’t ring a bell for fans of the series, it’s because the movie doesn’t follow a narrative from the games. For basic footing of the film’s mythos, check out the trailer below.

Every Assassin’s Creed game has heavily taken place in the past. A large selling point of the franchise has been the freedom to explore realistically constructed cities of famous time periods past. By openly stating that the film will predominantly take place in modern times, the film’s Executive Producer is admitting to the film’s departure from the gaming series. In fact, there seems to be an outgoing message of viewing this project as a film project, not a game to film adaptation. A brief list of things changed from the game include the animus, who the story follows and the ratio of time spent in the animus have been expressly changed while features of the game like eagle vision and the leaps of faith have been announced as included in the film. 

“We’re treating this as a cinematic experience as opposed to trying to bring a video game on the screen,” Fassbender said during a set visit with IGN. 

Later in the interview, Fassbender, the star and producer of the film, doubled down on the notion that this experience is meant to be different than the game. 

“It’s just that thing. This isn’t a video game that we’re making. We’re trying to make a cinematic experience, so there are new things we have to introduce,” Fassbender said. 

Assassin’s Creed is set to release Dec. 21, 2016. 

Check out the insane ticket pre-order deals that range from $15 all the way up to $1,200 here.


Quick Take

Departure doesn’t necessarily mean anything bad. In fact, it could be argued that Ubisoft’s adherence to yearly releases and the formula established in Assassin’s Creed 2 is responsible for the decline of the series. With that in mind, film works differently. Maybe they need to change things to make it work, maybe they don’t, but they can’t get any more out there than the story of Assassin’s Creed generally does, right?

Are you excited for Assassin’s Creed? Share your thoughts on the trailer in the comments.

 


Drake Lupton

Staff Writer

I'm a writer, musician and gamer who enjoys normal things like MMA, pizza and central air conditioning.